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Welcome to the new Verge

Welcome to the new Verge

We’ve got a whole new Verge for you today. Radically new. Sometimes you just have to blow things up and start over.Yes, we have a sharp new logo that started with the idea of an unfinished interface between the present and the future. Yes, we have a bright new color palette that highlights our work in confident new ways. Yes, we have new typefaces across the board, including serifs for our body copy. Look at these ink traps in our new headline font, Poly Sans. I love them.The new Verge typefaces.All of those things were designed and developed with great care by Vox Media’s spectacular in-house design team, and they will serve as the foundation for our site and our brand for years to come. The Verge is meant to be beautiful and boundary-pushing, and our new design reflects that.But new colors and typefaces are not the point of our redesign. Not even a little bit.The Verge primary color palette.Our goal in redesigning The Verge was actually to redesign the relationship we have with you, our beloved audience. Six years ago, we developed a design system that was meant to confidently travel across platforms as the media unbundled itself into article pages individually distributed by social media and search algorithms. There’s a reason we had bright pink pull quotes in articles and laser lines shooting across our videos: we wanted to be distinctly The Verge, no matter where we showed up.But publishing across other people’s platforms can only take you so far. And the more we lived with that decision, the more we felt strongly that our own platform should be an antidote to algorithmic news feeds, an editorial product made by actual people with intent and expertise. The Verge’s homepage is the single most popular page at Vox Media, and it should be a statement about what the internet can be at its best. So we sat down and thought about what was really important to us and how to make our homepage valuable every time you open it. We also thought about where we came from and how we built The Verge into what it is today. And we landed on: well shit, we just need to blog more.So we’re back to basics with something we’re calling the Storystream news feed, right on our homepage. Our plan is to bring the best of old-school blogging to a modern news feed experience and to have our editors and senior reporters constantly updating the site with the best of tech and science news from around the entire internet. If that means linking out to Wired or Bloomberg or some other news source, that’s great — we’re happy to send people to excellent work elsewhere, and we trust that our feed will be useful enough to have you come back later. If that means we just need to embed the viral TikTok or wacky CEO tweet and move on, so be it — we can do that. We can embed anything, actually: I’m particularly excited that we can directly point people to interesting threads on Reddit and other forums. The internet is about conversations, and The Verge should be a place to find great conversations.  » Read More

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Let's talk about Web Design

The term "web design" describes the layout of websites that are seen online. Instead of software development, it typically refers to the user experience components of website development. The primary focus of web design used to be creating websites for desktop browsers, but from the middle of the 2010s, designing for mobile and tablet browsers has gained significance.

What is a webdesigner?

A web designer is responsible for a website's look, feel, and occasionally even content. For instance, appearance refers to the colors, text, and images utilized. Information's organization and categorization are referred to as its layout. An effective web design is user-friendly, aesthetically pleasing, and appropriate for the target audience and brand of the website. Many websites focus on keeping things simple so that viewers won't be distracted or confused by additional information and functionality. Removing as many potential sources of user annoyance as possible is a crucial factor to take into account because the foundation of a web designer's output is a site that gains and nurtures the trust of the target audience.

Responsive and adaptive design are two of the most popular techniques for creating websites that function well on both desktop and mobile devices. In adaptive design, the website content is fixed in layout sizes that correspond to typical screen sizes, while in responsive design, information moves dynamically based on screen size. A layout that is as consistent as possible across devices is essential to preserving user engagement and trust. Designers must be cautious when giving up control of how their work will appear because responsive design can be challenging in this area. While they might need to diversify their skill set if they are also in charge of the content, they will benefit from having complete control over the final output.

What does a web design worker do?

A web designer is a member of the IT industry who is in charge of planning a website's structure, aesthetic appeal, and usability.

A skilled site designer must possess both technical know-how and creative graphic design abilities. They must be able to envision how a website will seem (its graphical design) and how it will operate (conversion of a design into a working website).

The terms web developer and designer are frequently used interchangeably but erroneously. In order to construct more complex interactions on a website, such as the integration with a database system, a web developer is frequently more likely to be a software developer who works with programming languages.