The World is Our Interface – The Evolution of UI Design

What happens if a new client comes to you with a website they want redesigned, but because analytics show that very few people visit or convert from mobile on the website, they want you to prioritize for desktop? Your data tells you this is wrong, but theirs suggests otherwise. As a web designer, you may be starting with little to no data of your own. It’s not until a website has launched (or relaunched) that you can start gathering real analytics on its performance. Even then, it can take awhile to draw any meaningful insights from it. So, in many cases, what web designers are working with before and while they design a new website is industry data: audience insights; competitive research; keyword analysis; Google announcements; marketing surveys and reports. For someone who builds websites day in and day out, it makes sense to watch industry insights closely. For your clients, though, it might not For someone who builds websites day in and day out, it makes sense to watch industry insights closely. For your clients, though, it might not. That’s because they come from a place where they make business decisions based on internal data — data about their audience, their location, their product, etc. They might use industry analytics as benchmarks, but not to drive something as important as their company’s direction. Let’s take a look at why this issue might arise and how you can overcome it by showing how analytics from a website paired with industry data is the best solution for designing a website.   What if Your Client’s Analytics Conflict with Industry Data? In 2015, Google announced that mobile searches had surpassed those on desktop. The news had everyone talking and eventually gave rise to trends like mobile-first, micro-moments, and voice UIs. In the web design space, there was no direction to go in but mobile-first. That didn’t mean that desktop users were completely forgotten; it just meant that mobile needed to take a front seat when designing the user experience. But let’s say you’re approached by a client who needs a redesign. They keep hammering home that they don’t want you to put too much effort into mobile since their analytics show that less than 9% of their traffic comes from mobile devices. The previous designer didn’t bother with mobile, so you shouldn’t either. While it would be nice to give a definitive response to this, there are two possible reasons why their mobile traffic is so low: They’re targeting an audience that isn’t heavy on mobile users to begin with; The website was designed for desktop and so it doesn’t rank well for searches performed on mobile. Now, you don’t want to brush your client off. Analytics are clearly important to your client, right? So what you need to do instead is broach the matter with facts.   Presenting Your Client with the Facts There are a number of ways you can use hard facts to convince your clients that the direction you want to take their website is the right one. 1. Use Proof from Google Mobile-first indexing officially became the way Google indexes and ranks all new websites in 2019. Even if your client believes that their audience primarily comes from desktop, it’s still important to play by Google’s rules in search if they want traffic from it. If you really want to drive this point home, you could run their website through Google’s Mobile-friendly Test: Seeing a result like the one the Yale School of Art gets would certainly help you strengthen your argument: 2. Use Proof from Their…

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