Linux on the Desktop as a Web Developer

Linux on the Desktop as a Web Developer

I’ve been using Ubuntu as my primary home desktop OS for the past year and a half, so I thought it would be a good time to write up my experiences. Hopefully this will be interesting to other web developers who are currently using Mac or Windows and may be Linux-curious. My basic setup. Dell XPS 13, Kensington trackball mouse (yes I’m a weirdo who likes trackballs), Apple magic keyboard (I still prefer the feel), and a BenQ monitor (because I play some games where display lag matters) Note: in this post, I’m mostly going to be talking about Ubuntu. I’ve played with other Linux distros, but I stick with Ubuntu because if I have a problem, I can Google it and find an answer 99.9% of the time. Some history I first switched to Linux in 2007, when I was at university. At the time I perceived it to be a huge step-up over Windows Vista (so much faster! and better for programmers!), but it also came with plenty of headaches: WiFi didn’t work out of the box. I had to use ndiswrapper to wrap Windows drivers. Multi-monitor and presentations were terrible. Every time I used xrandr I knew I would suffer. Poor support for a lot of consumer applications. I recall running Netflix on Firefox in Wine because this was the only way to get it to work. Around 2012 I switched to Mac – mostly because I noticed that every web developer giving a conference talk was using one. Then I became a dual Windows/Mac user when I joined Microsoft in 2016, and I didn’t consider Linux again until after I left Microsoft in 2018. I’m happy to say that none of my old Linux headaches exist anymore in 2020. On my Dell XPS 13 (which comes with Ubuntu preinstalled), WiFi and multi-monitor work out-of-the-box. And since it seems everything is either an Electron app or a website these days, it’s rare to find a consumer app that doesn’t support Linux. (At least, the ones I care about; I’m sure you can find a counter-example!) The biggest gripe I have nowadays is with fonts, which is a far cry from fiddling with WiFi drivers. OK so enough history, let’s talk about the good and the bad about Linux in 2020, from a web developer’s perspective. The command line I tend to live and breathe on the command line, and for me the command line on Linux is second-to-none. The main reason should be clear: if you’re writing code that’s going to run on a server somewhere, that server is probably going to run Linux. Even if you’re not doing much sysadmin stuff, you’re probably using Linux to run your test and CI infrastructure. So eventually your code is going to have to run on Linux. Using Linux as your desktop machine just makes things that much simpler. All my servers run Ubuntu, as do my Travis CI tests, as does my desktop. I know that my shell scripts will run exactly the same on all these environments. If you’ve ever run into headaches with subtle differences between the Mac and Linux shell (e.g. incompatible versions of grep, tar, and sed with slightly different flags, so you have to brew install coreutils and use ggrep and gtar… ugh), then you know what I’m talking about. If you’re a Mac user,  » Read More

Like to keep reading?

This article first appeared on nolanlawson.com. If you'd like to keep reading, follow the white rabbit.

View Full Article

Leave a Reply