Jack Dorsey Wants to Decentralize Twitter

https://voltomedia.com/fresh/wp-content/uploads/Jack-Dorsey-Wants-to-Decentralize-Twitter.png A look back at the top events, news, and trends for frontend and web development The world of frontend development once again evolved at a rapid pace over the past year, and this article recaps all the important events, news, and trends from 2019. React once again claims the top library and is still growing, and jQuery is surprisingly holding at #2. Not far behind that Angular and Vue both have a strong user base of passionate developers. Svelte has received a lot of attention this past year, but it is still fighting to gain adoption. From npmtrends.com — https://www.npmtrends.com/@angular/core-vs-react-vs-vue-vs-jquery-vs-svelte-vs-backbone-vs-react-native After a rather quiet year, WebAssembly received some huge news early December — it is officially recommended as a language of the web by the W3C Consortium. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is the main international standards organization for the World Wide Web. Since the announcement of WebAssembly in 2017, it has garnered heavy attention and rapid adoption. In previous years, we saw the 1.0 specification created and integration in all major browsers. Another piece of news for WebAssembly in 2019 is the formation of the Bytecode Alliance which looks “to forge WebAssembly’s outside-the-browser future by collaborating on implementing standards and proposing new ones”. We are still waiting for WebAssembly to truly take hold and gain mass adoption, and with each update, we get closer to that goal. There is no question that the W3C statement was a huge step to legitimize it for companies, and we need to continue to lower the barrier of entry for using WebAssembly to enable products to be more easily built with it. 2019 was the year of TypeScript. Not only has TypeScript become the defacto choice for adding data types to JS code, many developers are frequently electing to use it over vanilla JavaScript for both personal projects and at work. In the StackOverflow Survey released early in 2019, TypeScript was tied for 2nd with Python as the most loved language, falling only behind Rust. It wouldn’t be surprising to see TypeScript climb even higher in the new survey released in early 2020. TypeScript has consumed the web development world — both for the frontend and backend. Some developers tried to dismiss TS as a fad and thought it would go the way of Coffeescript, but TypeScript has proven to solve a core problem for JS developers and appears to only be growing in usage. TypeScript provides web devs a better developer experience with integrations for all major text editors. JavaScript developers view TypeScript as a tool that results in fewer bugs while also being easier to read code with the types and object interfaces offering self-documentation. It’s worth noting just how popular TypeScript has become with it passing React in NPM downloads in 2019. It also has far more downloads than competitors such as Flow and Reason. TypeScript and React solve entirely different problems, so this isn’t meant to be a direct comparison. It is only a demonstration of the popularity of TypeScript. TypeScript v3.0 came out in late 2018 and through 2019 it has released up to version 3.7 which includes newer ECMAScript features such as optional chaining and nullish operators as well as improvements to the type checking functionality. Vue and Angular have passionate users, with Vue even surpassed React in GitHub stars, but when it comes adoption for personal and professional projects, React continues to hold onto a strong lead. In late 2018, the React team introduced hooks. In 2019, hooks consumed the React world with an overwhelming majority of developers adopting them as their preferred way…

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