HTTP/3: The Past, the Present, and the Future

During last year’s Birthday Week we announced preliminary support for QUIC and HTTP/3 (or “HTTP over QUIC” as it was known back then), the new standard for the web, enabling faster, more reliable, and more secure connections to web endpoints like websites and APIs. We also let our customers join a waiting list to try QUIC and HTTP/3 as soon as they became available. Since then, we’ve been working with industry peers through the Internet Engineering Task Force, including Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, to iterate on the HTTP/3 and QUIC standards documents. In parallel with the standards maturing, we’ve also worked on improving support on our network. We are now happy to announce that QUIC and HTTP/3 support is available on the Cloudflare edge network. We’re excited to be joined in this announcement by Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, two of the leading browser vendors and partners in our effort to make the web faster and more reliable for all. In the words of Ryan Hamilton, Staff Software Engineer at Google, “HTTP/3 should make the web better for everyone. The Chrome and Cloudflare teams have worked together closely to bring HTTP/3 and QUIC from nascent standards to widely adopted technologies for improving the web. Strong partnership between industry leaders is what makes Internet standards innovations possible, and we look forward to our continued work together.” What does this mean for you, a Cloudflare customer who uses our services and edge network to make your web presence faster and more secure? Once HTTP/3 support is enabled for your domain in the Cloudflare dashboard, your customers can interact with your websites and APIs using HTTP/3. We’ve been steadily inviting customers on our HTTP/3 waiting list to turn on the feature (so keep an eye out for an email from us), and in the coming weeks we’ll make the feature available to everyone. What does this announcement mean if you’re a user of the Internet interacting with sites and APIs through a browser and other clients? Starting today, you can use Chrome Canary to interact with Cloudflare and other servers over HTTP/3. For those of you looking for a command line client, curl also provides support for HTTP/3. Instructions for using Chrome and curl with HTTP/3 follow later in this post. The Chicken and the Egg Standards innovation on the Internet has historically been difficult because of a chicken and egg problem: which needs to come first, server support (like Cloudflare, or other large sources of response data) or client support (like browsers, operating systems, etc)? Both sides of a connection need to support a new communications protocol for it to be any use at all. Cloudflare has a long history of driving web standards forward, from HTTP/2 (the version of HTTP preceding HTTP/3), to TLS 1.3, to things like encrypted SNI. We’ve pushed standards forward by partnering with like-minded organizations who share in our desire to help build a better Internet. Our efforts to move HTTP/3 into the mainstream are no different. Throughout the HTTP/3 standards development process, we’ve been working closely with industry partners to build and validate client HTTP/3 support compatible with our edge support. We’re thrilled to be joined by Google Chrome and curl, both of which can be used today to make requests to the Cloudflare edge over HTTP/3. Mozilla Firefox expects to ship support in a nightly release soon as well. Bringing this all together: today is a good day for Internet users; widespread rollout of HTTP/3 will mean a faster web experience for all, and today’s support is a large step toward that. More importantly,…

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