How Special Characters and Symbols Affect Screen Reader Accessibility

How Special Characters and Symbols Affect Screen Reader Accessibility

bighack.org bighack.org1 month ago in#UX Love46

Special characters and punctuation are the most important a part of the guidelines we percentage. But it’s price noting how they have an effect on accessibility. Particularly for display reader customers. It’s moderately not unusual to look folks the use of fancy fonts, characters and symbols on social media. Often folks use them for emphasis. Or to make their tweets or account handles glance other from the usual font. What are particular characters? Special characters constitute one thing rather than a letter or quantity. Standard punctuation marks and symbols to your keyboard are examples of particular characters. Like the exclamation mark “!”, or ampersand “&”. Unicode characters Unicode is an international coding usual. It contains alphabet characters and symbols from each language in the sector. Including Greek, Arabic, Thai and Cyrillic. Each persona has a person code that computer systems use to show a singular image. Unicode characters don’t seem on a normal keyboard. Although they’re recognised by way of maximum units, web pages, and packages. For instance, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Gmail all toughen Unicode characters. Unicode characters additionally come with miscellaneous symbols and pictographs. Like astrological, musical, political and non secular symbols. Yes, Unicode characters would possibly glance fascinating and stand out visually. But they’re inaccessible to display reader customers. Screen readers might skip them fully or learn one thing inappropriate to the person. This leaves folks feeling at a loss for words. And steadily left guessing what the meant message used to be. This is the case although you’re the use of Unicode characters that ‘glance’ like usual textual content. While a sighted person can see a stylised “t”, a display reader might learn out “mathematical sans-serif script t”. This signifies that even a brief phrase can take a very long time for display reader customers to procedure. Hear how a display reader offers with Unicode characters within the tweet under by way of Ken Dodds. Written in numerous particular persona font types, the textual content reads: “You suppose it’s adorable to put in writing your tweets and usernames this manner. But have you ever listened to what it feels like with assistive applied sciences like Voiceover?” You 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘬 it’s 𝒸𝓊𝓉ℯ to 𝘄𝗿𝗶𝘁𝗲 your tweets and usernames 𝖙𝖍𝖎𝖘 𝖜𝖆𝖞. But have you ever 𝙡𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙚𝙣𝙚𝙙 to what it 𝘴𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 with assistive applied sciences like 𝓥𝓸𝓲𝓬𝓮𝓞𝓿𝓮𝓻? percent.twitter.com/CywCf1b3Lm — Kent C. Dodds (@kentcdodds) January 9, 2019 Emoticons Emoticons are smiley faces created from usual letters and punctuation symbols. For instance, the use of a colon “:”, adopted by way of a splash, “-” and a closed bracket “)” to create a smiling face. These are other from ‘emojis’ that use cool animated film photos to put across an emotion or object. The tough factor about emoticons is that some display readers can learn them. Whereas others can’t. Emojis can in reality be extra obtainable than emoticons. This is as a result of emojis have alt-text that explains what the picture is to display reader customers. Whereas maximum display readers deal with emoticons like standard punctuation. ASCII artwork Also referred to as ‘textual content artwork’, ASCII artwork makes use of particular characters to shape photos. Text artwork is steadily used on Twitter and in on-line chats. But as it’s made the use of particular characters and areas, it’s no longer obtainable to display readers. You can pay attention how a display reader offers with ASCII artwork within the tweet under. It’s exhausting to get any that means from it. And it takes a very long time to learn out. If you favor ASCII artwork however need to be extra obtainable, take a screenshot, add it as a picture and upload alt-text. Here is a recording of a display…

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