A Product Hunt Launch Story for Programming Guides

A Product Hunt Launch Story for Programming Guides

hackernoon.com hackernoon.com3 years ago in #Dev Love59

Originally published by Pankaj Singh on March 26th 2019 How we turned a very simple idea into a useful product A Preview of Product Guides on QuickCode Background and coffee discussions There’s a joy every time you make progress, ship something you were working on, out in the real world for review. We recently did so, it went a bit unexpected at first, but ended pretty well for us! The product we shipped — “Programming Guides”. Its aim is to be a one-stop place to get the background information of the programming language, topics to focus on while learning, and its job potential. Usually, anyone would know what programming language or subject matter they want to learn. Then they would find a related course and study it. Simple, right? Apparently No. We at QuickCode aim to find the biggest challenges in online learning and solve them for learners around the world. As part of that effort, we launched features such as Collections and Learners in the last couple of months. (you can read about those features here). Once we launched these, we noticed, “How to get started” as a recurring issue faced by our users in our user interviews and survey. Survey Results for Learning Challenges At first, it was a surprise since both of us. Since we and our friends around had technical backgrounds, we weren’t sure what do users mean by this. We too have taken several online courses in the past. We know that technology tutorials for beginners would usually walk them through the simplest of steps to get you started. So what’s the missing link here? Usually, anyone would know what programming language or subject matter they want to learn. Then they would find a related course and study it. Simple, right? Apparently No. A New Audience The assumption that all those people are from programming or a technology background was that mistake. Somewhere during these discussions, we figured, that we are making a big assumption here. The assumption that all those people are from programming or a technology background was that mistake. We immediately took the next logical step. We dug into our data sources and pulled out the data for users with and without a programming background. In the last 12 months, a little over 20% of our new learners were from a non-programming background. Learners with Programming and Non-Programming Background We felt good about it as it meant that our platform is reaching to a wider audience. At the same time, it also hinted our lack of preparation in addressing an audience segment like this. Now it was important for us to assess how we want to address this audience. Should we simply go with the flow and serve the core programming audience? Or should we try to help this new audience base which we didn’t expect? Data God To help us proceed, we turned to the new God of 21st Century again- The Data God! We went back to our data sources and researched a bit more about non-programming learners. Soon data showed us the way. The number of non-programming learners though initially small has been gradually increasing. Here’s a trendline for new non-programming learners on QuickCode in the last 12 months. Increase in Number of Non-Programming Learners taking Programming Courses The answer was as clear as sparkling water (bad joke I know!).  » Read More

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