25 Creative Logo Designs for Inspiration

Handwritten logos range from elegant and sophisticated, well-readable, done in classic calligraphy, modern and clear, to intricate, illegible, abstract, and those that look like a child drew them. They’re widely used by people who wish to introduce themselves through their work and who consider their brand an indispensable part of their own identity. Furthermore, they’re quite popular amongst large companies, in the hospitality industry, and brands with a long-standing tradition. The Miss Jones Café logo was created by Brenton Craig and the Autumn Studio. This is one of those perfectly clear and readable handwritten logotypes done in a child-like and fresh style. It’s not defined by any design rules, but it’s rather created using free motion handwriting that beautifully reflects the spirit of the café. The brands that are all about individuality and originality often incorporate those same values in logo design, and that becomes the foundation of their visual identity. For them, the focus is not as much on information and functionality as it is on portraying a specific feeling. The logotype for the luxurious handbag brand Giusti & Hrechko was made by Marina Mescaline. It oozes Italian impulsiveness and energy. These attributes make the logo look quite novel and are more important than the readability of the letters itself. The logotype for LetterScout comes from the collection of symbols and signs of the typographer Joseph Arp. It’s based on principles of classic calligraphy and handwriting but with a modern twist. This is a common approach in contemporary calligraphy, where the authentic stroke of a hand is used as a starting point for a logo design, which is then further processed and shaped until the desired result is achieved. There are examples where the illegibility of a logo is not considered a fault, but is rather seen as its artistic quality. That’s exactly what the Nezhno Ceramics’ logo, created by Radmir Volk, looks like. This is a light, delicate print in the form of a linear vignette, that looks even more distinct when engraved at the bottom of ceramic vessels.  » Read More

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